Melancholy in a sentence yahoo dating

perturbation | Definition of perturbation in English by Oxford Dictionaries

melancholy in a sentence yahoo dating

Example sentences with the word and. and example sentences. him with pleasant thoughts, and you have filled his mind with melancholy. Additionally, online stores powered by Yahoo and Google and Amazon exist Poetry and art, and the fairest and most memorable of the actions of men, date from such an hour. Evening of Light Ex Abyssō II, released 15 October 1. ARGIFLEX - Crystal Highway (DAWtypeBeat) 2. uncertain - Daughter Drowning in the Black River Ex . My friend is dating a guy who is and I'm just curious if anyone has dealt with this. Some people just have a melancholic temperament. Those of us who speak English have a problem with the definition of depression, since it includes .

Murner, who was born in and died inapparently references the baby and bathwater expression several times in his book, indicating that he probably did not coin the metaphor and that it was already established in Germany at that time. Later the use of bandbox was extended to equate to a hatbox, so the meaning of the phrase alludes to someone's appearance, especially their clothing, being as smart as a new hat fresh out of a hatbox.

In more recent times, as tends to be with the evolution of slang, the full expression has been shortened simply to 'bandbox'. In the US bandbox is old slang late s, through to the early s for a country workhouse or local prison, which, according to Cassells also referred later ss to a prison from which escape is easy. These US slang meanings are based on allusion to the small and not especially robust confines of a cardboard hatbox. I am additionally informed thanks V Smith that bandbox also refers to a small ballpark stadium with short boundaries enabling relatively easy home runs to be struck in baseball games.

The bandbox expression in baseball seemingly gave rise to the notion of band's box in a small theatre, which could be either an additional or alternative root of the expression when it is used in the baseball stadium context. The idea is that as workload permits, sectors can be combined and split again without having to change the frequencies that aircraft are on.

You may have noticed that for a particular 'SID' 'standard instrument departure' - the basic take-off procedure you are almost always given the same frequency after departure. By 'bandboxing' two adjacent sectors working them from a single position rather than two you can work aircraft in the larger airspace at one time saving staff and also simplifying any co-ordination that may have taken place when they are 'split'.

To facilitate this the two frequencies are 'cross-coupled'. This means that the controller transmits on both frequencies simultaniously and when an aircraft calls on one, the transmission is retransmitted on the second frequency. Therefore the pilots are much less likely to step on one another and it appears as if all aircraft are on the same frequency.

Then when traffic loading requires the sectors to be split once more, a second controller simply takes one of the frequencies from the other, the frequencies are un-cross-coupled, and all being well there is a seamless transition from the pilots' perspective!

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I am therefore at odds with most commentators and dictionaries for suggesting the following: The 'bring home the bacon' expression essentially stems from the fact that bacon was the valuable and staple meat provision of common people hundreds of years ago, and so was an obvious metaphor for a living wage or the provision of basic sustenance.

Peasants and poor town-dwelling folk in olden times regarded other meats as simply beyond their means, other than for special occasions if at all.

melancholy in a sentence yahoo dating

Bacon was a staple food not just because of availability and cost but also because it could be stored for several weeks, or most likely hung up somewhere, out of the dog's reach.

Other reasons for the significance of the word bacon as an image and metaphor in certain expressions, and for bacon being a natural association to make with the basic needs of common working people, are explained in the 'save your bacon' meanings and origins below.

Additionally the 'bring home the bacon' expression, like many other sayings, would have been appealing because it is phonetically pleasing to say and to hear mainly due to the 'b' alliteration repetition. Expressions which are poetic and pleasing naturally survive and grow - 'Bring home the vegetables' doesn't have quite the same ring. According to Allen's English Phrases there could possibly have been a contributory allusion to pig-catching contests at fairs, and although at first glance the logic for this seems not to be strong given the difference between a live pig or a piglet and a side of cured bacon the suggestion gains credibility when we realise that until the late middle ages bacon referred more loosely to the meat of a pig, being derived from German for back.

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Whatever, the idea of 'bringing home' implicity suggests household support, and the metaphor of bacon as staple sustenance is not only supported by historical fact, but also found in other expressions of olden times.

Given so much association between bacon and common people's basic dietary needs it is sensible to question any source which states that 'bring home the bacon' appeared no sooner than the 20th century, by which time ordinary people had better wider choice of other sorts of other meat, so that then the metaphor would have been far less meaningful. In other words, why would people have fixed onto the bacon metaphor when it was no longer a staple and essential presence in people's diets?

Fascinatingly the establishment and popularity of the expression was perhaps also supported if not actually originally underpinned by the intriguing 13th century custom at Dunmow in Essex, apparently according to Brewer founded by a noblewoman called Juga in and restarted in by Robert de Fitzwalter, whereby any man from anywhere in England who, kneeling on two stones at the church door, could swear that for the past year he had not argued with his wife nor wished to be parted from her, would be awarded a 'gammon of bacon'.

Seemingly this gave rise to the English expression, which according to Brewer was still in use at the end of the s 'He may fetch a flitch of bacon from Dunmow' a flitch is a 'side' of bacon; a very large slabwhich referred to a man who was amiable and good-tempered to his wife.

This meaning is very close to the modern sense of 'bringing home the bacon': Brewer says one origin is the metaphor of keeping the household's winter store of bacon protected from huge numbers of stray scavenging dogs.

melancholy in a sentence yahoo dating

In that sense the meaning was to save or prevent a loss. The establishment of the expression however relies on wider identification with the human form: Bacon and pig-related terms were metaphors for 'people' in several old expressions of from 11th to 19th century, largely due to the fact that In the mid-to-late middle ages, bacon was for common country people the only meat affordably available, which caused it and associated terms hog, pig, swine to be used to describe ordinary country folk by certain writers and members of the aristocracy.

Norman lords called Saxon people 'hogs'. A 'chaw-bacon' was a derogatory term for a farm labourer or country bumpkin chaw meant chew, so a 'chaw-bacon' was the old equivalent of the modern insult 'carrot-cruncher'. See also 'bring home the bacon'. It's simply a shortening of 'The bad thing that happened was my fault, sorry'. The word bad in this case has evolved to mean 'mistake which caused a problem'. It's another example of the tendency for language to become abbreviated for more efficient and stylised communications.

In this case the abbreviation is also a sort of teenage code, which of course young people everywhere use because they generally do not wish to adopt lifestyle and behaviour advocated by parents, teachers, authority, etc.

For new meanings of words to evolve there needs to be a user-base of people that understands the new meanings. Initially the 'my bad' expression was confined to a discrete grouping, ie. Now it seems the understanding and usage of the 'my bad' expression has grown, along with the students, and entered the mainstream corporate world, no doubt because US middle management and boardrooms now have a high presence of people who were teenagers at college or university 20 years ago.

I am also informed thanks K Korkodilos that the 'my bad' expression was used in the TV series 'Buffy The Vampire Slayer', and that this seems to have increased its popular mainstream usage during the s, moreover people using the expression admitted to watching the show when asked about the possible connection.

  • Can someone use melancholy in a sentence please?

Additionally thanks M Woolley apparently the 'my bad' expression is used by the Fred character in the new Scooby Doo TV series, which is leading to the adoption of the phrase among the under-5's in London, and logically, presumbly, older children all over England too.

There is it seems no stopping this one. Also, thanks J Davis " There's a common Mexican phrase, 'Mi malo', which means, literally, 'My bad', and it may be where this comes from, since it's a common phrase here in Southern California, and was before Buffy was ever on the air.

Furthemore, thanks J Susky, Sep " I'm fairly sure I first heard it in the summer, outdoors, in Anchorage, Alaska - which would put it pre-Sept If you know more please tell me.

A still earlier meaning of the word was more precisely 'a jumbled mixture of words', and before that from Scandinavia 'a mixture'. Skeat's dictionary provides the most useful clues as to origins: Scandinavian meanings were for 'poor stuff' or a 'poor weak drink', which was obviously a mixture of sorts.

In Danish 'balder' was noise or clatter, and the word danske was slap or flap, which led to an older alternative meaning of a 'confused noise', or any mixture. Certain dictionaries suggest an initial origin of a frothy drink from the English 16thC, but this usage was derived from the earlier 'poor drink' and 'mixture' meanings and therefore was not the root, just a stage in the expression's development. Balti is generally now regarded as being the anglicised name of the pan in which the balti dish is cooked, a pan which is conventionally known as the 'karai' in traditional Urdu language.

The mythological explanation is that the balti pan and dish are somehow connected with the supposed 'Baltistan' region of Pakistan, or a reference to that region by imaginative England-based curry house folk, who seem first to have come up with the balti menu option during the s. Indeed Hobson Jobson, the excellent Anglo-Indian dictionary, 2nd editionlists the word 'balty', with the clear single meaning: Further confirmation is provided helpfully by Ahmed Syed who kindly sent me the following about the subject: In larger families or when guests visit, the need for larger pots arose.

Balti dishes originate from Pakistan, customarily cooked in a wok style pan outside hotels and people's homes.

How would you use melancholy in a sentence? | Yahoo Answers

The process is based on boiling the meat of chicken or goat on low heat with garlic and chilli powder in some cases until it is tender and the water reduced to a sauce. Then fresh tomatoes, green chillies, ginger and spices are added, and the meat is fried until a sauce is produced.

Renowned as an extra spicy dish, the Balti is revered by young and old. See also the derivation of the racial term 'Gringo', which has similar origins. Another school of thought and possible contributory origin is that apparently in Latin there was such a word as 'barba' meaning beard. A Roman would visit the tonsor to have his beard shaved, and the non Romans, who frequently wore beards barbaswere thereby labelled barbarians.

melancholy in a sentence yahoo dating

Ack AA for the beard theory. I am additionally informed thanks S Walker that perhaps the earliest derivation of babble meaning unintelligible speech is from the ancient Hebrew word for the city of Babel meaning Babylonwhich is referred to in the Bible, Genesis Many people seem now to infer a meaning of the breath being metaphorically 'baited' like a trap or a hook, waiting to catch something instead of the original non-metaphorical original meaning, which simply described the breath being cut short, or stopped as with a sharp intake of breath.

The expression appears in Shakespeare's The Merchant Of Venice as batedwhich dates its origin as 16th century or earlier. The word bate is a shortened form of abate, both carrying the same meaning to hold back, reduce, stop, etcand first appeared in the s, prior to which the past tense forms were baten and abaten.

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How would you use melancholy in a sentence?

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